Daddy’s Heaven

The other day while walking my property here, my little country home I call Happy Hollow, even though I’ve been very happy here for a long time, I had a deep sense that something was missing. I couldn’t shake it. I sat down and this wrote itself in one long stream of consciousness.

It is a meditation of sorts, a hymn to honor the happiness and the beauty I’ve been fortunate to find here, and also a prayer for what I never had. I’ve spent many, many happy hours here soaking in the beauty and peace and joy it brings me, but lacking someone to share it with. A partner, a friend, a lover, a soul mate, a child at heart like me, yet capable and responsible too, a grown-up who refuses to grow old. My other half in the truest sense. The partner I never found. Continue reading

Welcome to the New Site

Welcome to the new web site for Happy Hollow! I am in the early stages of moving all my sites to this WordPress enabled web so that content can be more easily updated and catalogued. Be sure to come back soon, and click the social media icons at the top for other images and more about me and Happy Hollow, Home for our Furry and Feathered Friends

Day 2: Mourning in Beersville

Yesterday I woke up without a dog beside the bed. I walked downstairs without the sound of a dog following me down. I started the coffee without putting food in the dog bowl first. I sat on the toilet without a dog pushing the door open and pushing his head between my knees to look at me with those unbelievably loving eyes…

I can’t go on………..I go on. Continue reading

Male Bonding

I walk a lot more now. I walked a lot before too. But now I walk more times a day, just not as far as before.

It’s essential for my recovery.

Open Heart Surgery, Mitral Valve Repair. One week ago yesterday.

Age 56. Been healthy all my life, no known prior health problems.

Nothing like a little wake up call late in middle age to start you thinking about things. Continue reading

Mysterious Occurrence Baffles Homeowner

Sometime during the night of June 21, 2004, a garbage bag placed on the front porch of a home near Bath, PA mysteriously erupted spewing its contents throughout the porch and into the main house.

“I’m certain I closed the door from the house onto the porch last night before retiring,” said homeowner Stan Frantz

But this is the scene he was greeted with this morning. Continue reading

Funerals

an  excerpt from The 28 Inch Mill by Robert D. Frantz

Sometimes we’d hafta cover for some of the old guys, you know, who didn’t want to go to the wash house.

In them days when you became too old and didn’t have the time in or the inclination to take your pension they’d give you a job as janitor in the wash house, but some guys were just too proud. So that made the job even tougher, but you knew some day you were gonna get old too and need help.

I seen a lotta guys start out as young tigers and end up hardly able to get through the turn. You could tell when a guy was hurtin’ and pushin’ himself and pretty soon he wouldn’t be around. Then you’d hear he was in St. Luke’s. Next thing you know he’d be gone. Continue reading

The Roller

an excerpt from The 28 Inch Mill by Robert D. Frantz

After the roller’d finished settin’ up the mill, he’d signal the rougher operator to blow up and he’d blow two and call the pusher on the P. A.

“O. K. Wayne, try one.”

And we’d run a bar through the mill and then the assistant roller, it was always the assistant roller, would walk down to the hot saw to get a test piece.

Didja ever think about that Janos? Anybody could go down and pick up a test piece, but it was always the assistant roller. Continue reading

United Nations

an excerpt from The 28 Inch Mill by Robert D. Frantz

Janos, Janos, it’s Karl, yeah, Karl Yoder. Hey, how’re you doin’? Sit down and have a drink. Jeez, its good to see ya. I been thinkin’ about the mill. It’s been over thirty years since they shut down the 28. I been wonderin’ how all the guys are doin’.

We really had our own United Nations down there. Hungarians, Slovaks, Polacks, Italians, Germans, Irish, Mexicans, Romanians, Austrians, Russians, Greeks, Jews, Arabs. You name it we had it. All got along real good too.

It wasn’t always that way though. Back in the 1800’s Bethlehem Steel was started by the Germans and for the first twenty or thirty years they held all the jobs. Then they started to hire the Irish and gave them all the lousy jobs, like the coke works and shovelin’ scale, stuff like that. Continue reading